A Dry and Thirsty Land

Papua New Guinea is a land covered in mountains and rainforests.  Typically the monsoon rains roll out across the Pacific from southeast Asia and keep PNG soaked.  Our year here is marked by two seasons “rainy” and “dry.” IMG_1890 Dry season usually meaning it only rains 2-3 times per week instead of twice a day.  This year is quite different.  The monsoon season that usually will run through June ended early with very little rain in June-September. This included a five week stretch without a drop.  This abnormal weather is being caused by one of the most significant El Niño weather patterns in recent history.  While other parts of the world are flooding PNG is on pace to have one of the driest years in its’ history. Similar droughts having occurred in 1964 and 1997. In a place where almost everyone relies on their gardens for most of their staple food this is starting to become a real hardship with many families going hungry. The staple food here is kaukau, very similar to yam or sweat potato, which is harvested four times per year. DSC_5803One growing cycle has been completely lost and another is in jeopardy. Imagine how this affects a place that has no familiarity with drought and where most homes are still without electricity. This country’s ability to cope with drought and famine is not present.  We need rain and need it badly.  I can not recall every experiencing first hand how important water is. We’ve begun seeing increasing numbers of infectious diseases related to the worsening water supply.  As small streams are drying up and people are utilizing the bigger rivers nearby much more heavily the contamination in these water sources is mounting. The Kane, our river, is now so low that even with the new reservoir the hospital’s hydro is not able to produce enough electricity to keep the station and hospital powered.  We have resorted to running on generators for long stints when the water level is too low.  The hospital’s backup generator is in the process of being replaced as the current one is well beyond its’ lifespan.  Usually the generator kicks on in a few seconds when the power goes down but today the auto switch was not working. The lights were out for several minutes in the operating theatre. Today, I was thankful for battery powered headlamps and a battery backup for the anesthesia machine.  I was also reminded of one of my favorite quotes from a seasoned missionary surgeon, “Anyone can operate with the lights on.”

When you turn on your faucet and water comes out, flip on a light switch and the lights come on or enjoy the luxury of flushing a toilet,  remember to pray for rain in PNG.DSC_5800

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